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The Original Hydrangea: A Look at its History and Cultivation


the original hydrangea
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Hydrangeas are beloved plants, known for their large, showy blooms and their ability to thrive in a variety of climates. But did you know that there is an original hydrangea, from which all other varieties have been developed? In this post, we'll take a closer look at the history and cultivation of the original hydrangea.

The Original Hydrangea: What is it?

The original hydrangea, also known as Hydrangea macrophylla, is a species of flowering plant native to Japan, China, and Korea. It is known for its large, round flower heads, which can range in color from pink to blue to purple, depending on the acidity of the soil.

A Brief History of the Original Hydrangea

The original hydrangea was first introduced to Europe in the 18th century, where it quickly became popular among gardeners and horticulturists. Over time, breeders began to develop new cultivars of the plant, selecting for traits such as flower color, size, and shape. Today, there are hundreds of different hydrangea cultivars available, but they all trace their lineage back to the original hydrangea.

Cultivating the Original Hydrangea

If you're interested in growing the original hydrangea in your own garden, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, the plant prefers well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. Second, it needs regular watering, especially during hot, dry weather. Finally, it should be pruned in late winter or early spring to encourage new growth and promote an attractive shape.

Hydrangea Varieties: A Look at Some of the Most Popular

While the original hydrangea is certainly beautiful, there are many other varieties of hydrangeas that are also worth considering. Here are just a few:

Paniculata Hydrangeas

Paniculata hydrangeas are known for their large, cone-shaped flower heads, which can reach up to 18 inches in length. They are also highly tolerant of heat and cold, making them a great choice for gardeners in a variety of climates.

Arborescens Hydrangeas

Arborescens hydrangeas are native to North America and are known for their fluffy, white flowers. They are also highly adaptable, able to grow in both sun and shade.

Quercifolia Hydrangeas

Quercifolia hydrangeas, also known as oakleaf hydrangeas, are named for their leaves, which resemble those of an oak tree. They are known for their conical flower heads and their ability to tolerate drought.

Caring for Your Hydrangeas: Tips and Tricks

Whether you're growing the original hydrangea or one of its many cultivars, there are a few things to keep in mind when caring for your plants. Here are some tips and tricks:

Watering

Hydrangeas need regular watering, especially during hot, dry weather. Try to water deeply but infrequently, rather than giving your plants small amounts of water every day.

Fertilizing

Hydrangeas benefit from regular fertilization, especially during the growing season. Use a balanced fertilizer that is high in phosphorus to encourage healthy blooms.

Pruning

Hydrangeas should be pruned in late winter or early spring to promote new growth and remove any dead or damaged branches. Be sure to use clean, sharp pruning shears to avoid damaging the plant.

Frequently Asked Questions about Hydrangeas

1. What is the best soil for hydrangeas?

Hydrangeas prefer well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. They also prefer soil that is slightly acidic.

2. How often should I water my hydrangeas?

Hydrangeas need regular watering, especially during hot, dry weather. Try to water deeply but infrequently, rather than giving your plants small amounts of water every day.

3. Can hydrangeas grow in full sun?

While most hydrangeas prefer partial shade, some varieties can tolerate full sun. Be sure to check the specific requirements for the type of hydrangea you are growing.

4. When should I prune my hydrangeas?

Hydrangeas should be pruned in late winter or early spring to promote new growth and remove any dead or damaged branches.

5. How can I change the color of my hydrangea flowers?

The color of hydrangea flowers can be changed by adjusting the acidity of the soil. Adding aluminum sulfate to the soil will make the flowers more blue, while adding lime will make them more pink.


Image the original hydrangea



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