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Trailing Sedum: A Guide to Growing and Caring for These Beautiful Plants


trailing sedum
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If you're looking for an easy-to-grow plant that will add beauty and texture to your garden or landscape, then look no further than trailing sedum. Also known as stonecrop, these plants are native to many parts of the world and are prized for their low-maintenance nature and ability to thrive in a variety of growing conditions.

In this guide, we'll explore everything you need to know about growing and caring for trailing sedum. From planting to propagation, we'll cover it all. So, let's get ed!

Planting Trailing Sedum

The first step in growing trailing sedum is to choose the right location. These plants prefer full sun to partial shade, and they do best in well-draining soil. You can also grow them in containers if you don't have space in your garden.

When planting, make sure to dig a hole that is slightly larger than the root ball of your sedum plant. Then, backfill the hole with soil and gently tamp it down around the plant. Water thoroughly after planting to help the roots establish themselves.

Choosing the Right Soil

Trailing sedum prefers well-draining soil that is slightly acidic to neutral. If your soil is heavy and clay-like, consider amending it with sand, perlite, or vermiculite to improve drainage. You can also add organic matter like compost or peat moss to help retain moisture in sandy soils.

Watering Trailing Sedum

Once established, trailing sedum is drought-tolerant and requires little water. However, it's important to water newly planted sedum regularly until the roots have had a chance to establish themselves. After that, you can water only when the soil is dry to the touch.

Feeding Trailing Sedum

Trailing sedum doesn't require much in terms of fertilizer. A light application of a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in spring is usually sufficient. Avoid over-fertilizing, as this can lead to leggy growth and reduced flowering.

Caring for Trailing Sedum

One of the great things about trailing sedum is that they are low-maintenance plants that don't require much care. However, there are a few things you can do to keep them looking their best.

Pruning Trailing Sedum

Trailing sedum benefits from regular pruning to help maintain its shape and encourage bushier growth. You can pinch back the tips of the stems in early summer to promote branching, or you can prune back the entire plant by one-third to one-half in late summer after flowering.

Dividing Trailing Sedum

Over time, trailing sedum can become crowded and to lose vigor. To prevent this, you can divide your plants every three to five years in early spring or fall. Simply dig up the clump and separate it into smaller sections, making sure each section has roots and shoots.

Propagation

Trailing sedum is easy to propagate from stem cuttings or leaf cuttings. Here's how:

Propagating from Stem Cuttings

To propagate trailing sedum from stem cuttings, simply take a 4-6 inch cutting from the tip of a healthy stem. Remove the lower leaves, leaving only a few at the top, and dip the cut end in rooting hormone. Then, plant the cutting in a pot filled with well-draining soil and keep it moist until roots develop.

Propagating from Leaf Cuttings

To propagate trailing sedum from leaf cuttings, simply remove a healthy leaf from the plant and let it dry for a few days. Once it has calloused over, place the leaf on top of well-draining soil and mist it lightly. Within a few weeks, new plants will to grow from the base of the leaf.

Uses for Trailing Sedum

Trailing sedum is a versatile plant that can be used in a variety of ways in your garden or landscape. Here are a few ideas:

Ground Cover

Trailing sedum makes an excellent ground cover, spreading quickly to form a dense mat of foliage and flowers. It's perfect for sunny areas where other plants might struggle, and it requires little maintenance once established.

Rock Gardens

Trailing sedum looks great in rock gardens or as a filler between stones in a pathway. Its low-growing habit and ability to thrive in poor soil make it an ideal choice for these types of settings.

Containers

Trailing sedum is also well-suited for container gardening. It looks great spilling over the edge of a pot or hanging basket, and its low-maintenance nature means you won't have to water or fertilize it often.

Pests and Diseases

Trailing sedum is generally resistant to pests and diseases, but there are a few things to watch out for:

Sedum Leaf Miner

The sedum leaf miner is a small fly that lays its eggs on the leaves of sedum plants. The larvae then tunnel inside the leaves, causing brown blotches and distortion. To control this pest, remove and destroy affected leaves, or use an insecticide labeled for leaf miners.

Crown Rot

Crown rot is a fungal disease that can affect trailing sedum plants. It causes the plant to wilt and die, and there is no cure once it sets in. To prevent this disease, make sure your soil is well-draining and avoid over-watering your plants.


Trailing sedum is a beautiful and low-maintenance plant that is perfect for gardeners of all levels. Whether you're looking for a ground cover, rock garden filler, or container plant, trailing sedum is an excellent choice. By following the tips and techniques outlined in this guide, you can grow and care for these plants with confidence.

FAQs

Q: How often should I water my trailing sedum?

A: Trailing sedum is drought-tolerant and requires little water once established. Water newly planted sedum regularly until the roots have had a chance to establish themselves, then water only when the soil is dry to the touch.

Q: Can trailing sedum be grown indoors?

A: While trailing sedum can technically be grown indoors, it prefers full sun to partial shade and does best in well-draining soil. If you want to grow it indoors, make sure it gets plenty of light and that the soil is well-draining.

Q: How do I propagate trailing sedum from stem cuttings?

A: To propagate trailing sedum from stem cuttings, simply take a 4-6 inch cutting from the tip of a healthy stem. Remove the lower leaves, leaving only a few at the top, and dip the cut end in rooting hormone. Then, plant the cutting in a pot filled with well-draining soil and keep it moist until roots develop.

Q: What is crown rot, and how can I prevent it?

A: Crown rot is a fungal disease that can affect trailing sedum plants. It causes the plant to wilt and die, and there is no cure once it sets in. To prevent this disease, make sure your soil is well-draining and avoid over-watering your plants.

Q: How do I prune my trailing sedum?

A: Trailing sedum benefits from regular pruning to help maintain its shape and encourage bushier growth. You can pinch back the tips of the stems in early summer to promote branching, or you can prune back the entire plant by one-third to one-half in late summer after flowering.

Q: Can trailing sedum be used as a ground cover?

A: Yes, trailing sedum makes an excellent ground cover, spreading quickly to form a dense mat of foliage and flowers. It's perfect for sunny areas where other plants might struggle, and it requires little maintenance once established.


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