Skip to content Skip to sidebar Skip to footer

Nasturtium in Hanging Pots: A Beautiful Addition to Your Garden


nasturtium in hanging pots
Table of Contents

If you're looking for a new way to add some color and beauty to your garden, consider planting nasturtiums in hanging pots. These gorgeous plants are not only easy to care for but also come in a variety of colors and sizes, making them the perfect addition to any outdoor space. In this article, we'll explore everything you need to know about growing nasturtiums in hanging pots, from the best soil to use, to how often to water them, and more.

Why Choose Nasturtiums?

Nasturtiums are a popular choice for gardeners because they are easy to grow, low-maintenance, and produce beautiful flowers. They are also versatile, as they can be grown in a variety of different settings, including hanging pots. Some other reasons why you might consider growing nasturtiums in hanging pots include their ability to repel pests like aphids and whiteflies, their edible flowers and leaves, and their long blooming period.

Choosing the Right Hanging Pot

When selecting a pot for your nasturtiums, it's important to choose one that is large enough to accommodate the plant's roots and allow for proper drainage. A good rule of thumb is to choose a pot that is at least 12 inches deep and has a diameter of 10-12 inches. You can also opt for a hanging basket or container with a built-in hook, which will make it easy to suspend your nasturtiums in a sunny spot.

Materials

When it comes to materials, there are a few options to choose from, including plastic, clay, metal, and wooden pots or baskets. Plastic is a popular choice because it is lightweight and affordable, while clay and metal offer better drainage but can be more expensive. Wooden pots are a great option if you want a natural look, but they may not last as long as other materials.

Soil Requirements

Nasturtiums prefer well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. You can use a commercial potting mix or create your own by mixing equal parts of peat moss, perlite, and vermiculite. It's also a good idea to add some compost or aged manure to the soil before planting to provide additional nutrients.

pH Level

The ideal pH level for growing nasturtiums ranges from 6.0 to 7.5. If your soil is too acidic, you can add lime to raise the pH level. If it's too alkaline, you can add sulfur to lower it.

Planting Nasturtiums

Once you've chosen your pot and soil, it's time to plant your nasturtiums. by filling your pot with soil, then make a small hole in the center of the soil using your finger or a gardening tool. Place the nasturtium seed in the hole and cover it with soil, then water the soil thoroughly.

Spacing

If you're planting multiple nasturtiums in the same pot, space them at least 8-10 inches apart to give them room to grow. You can also plant them closer together if you want a fuller, more compact look.

Watering

Nasturtiums in hanging pots require regular watering, especially during hot and dry weather. Water your plants deeply once a week, or more often if the soil feels dry to the touch. Avoid overwatering, as too much water can lead to root rot and other problems.

Drainage

Make sure your pot has good drainage holes to prevent water from pooling at the bottom of the pot. You can also add a layer of gravel or small rocks to the bottom of the pot to improve drainage.

Fertilizing

Nasturtiums are light feeders and do not require frequent fertilization. However, you can give them a boost by fertilizing them once a month with a balanced fertilizer. Avoid using high-nitrogen fertilizers, as these can promote leaf growth at the expense of flowers.

Organic Fertilizer

If you prefer to use organic fertilizers, you can use compost or aged manure instead. Simply mix a small amount into the soil around your plants every few weeks.

Pests and Diseases

One of the benefits of growing nasturtiums is that they are relatively pest-resistant. However, they can still be susceptible to pests like aphids, whiteflies, and caterpillars. To prevent infestations, keep your plants healthy by watering and fertilizing them regularly, and remove any damaged or diseased leaves or flowers.

Companion Planting

You can also try companion planting with nasturtiums, as they are believed to repel pests like aphids and attract beneficial insects like ladybugs and bees. Some good companion plants to grow with nasturtiums include marigolds, basil, and chives.

Harvesting

In addition to their beautiful flowers, nasturtiums are also prized for their edible leaves and flowers. The leaves have a slightly peppery flavor, while the flowers are more mild and sweet. To harvest the leaves and flowers, simply pick them off the plant and rinse them thoroughly before using them in salads, sandwiches, or as a garnish.

Blooming Period

Nasturtiums have a long blooming period, typically from late spring to early fall. Deadheading your plants regularly can help prolong the blooming period by encouraging new growth.


Growing nasturtiums in hanging pots is a great way to add some color and beauty to your garden with minimal effort. With the right pot, soil, and care, these versatile plants can thrive in any outdoor space. Remember to water and fertilize them regularly, keep an eye out for pests and diseases, and enjoy their edible leaves and flowers all season long.

FAQs

Q1: Do nasturtiums need full sun or partial shade?

A: Nasturtiums prefer full sun to partial shade, so make sure to place your hanging pot in a spot that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.

Q2: Can I grow nasturtiums indoors?

A: Yes, you can grow nasturtiums indoors as long as they are placed in a sunny location and receive regular watering and fertilization.

Q3: How often should I deadhead my nasturtiums?

A: It's a good idea to deadhead your nasturtiums every few days to encourage new growth and prolong the blooming period.

Q4: Can I grow other plants in the same pot as my nasturtiums?

A: Yes, you can grow other plants in the same pot as your nasturtiums as long as they have similar growing requirements and do not overcrowd the pot.

Q5: How can I tell if my nasturtiums are getting too much or too little water?

A: If your nasturtiums are getting too much water, you may notice yellowing leaves, root rot, or other signs of stress. If they are getting too little water, the leaves may wilt and the flowers may become smaller and fewer in number.
Sure thing! Before we begin, let me just confirm a few more details. Would you like me to focus on the aesthetics of nasturtium in hanging pots, or would you like me to provide practical tips on how to grow and care for them in this type of container? Or perhaps a combination of both? Let me know so I can tailor the post to your preferences. Great! In that case, I can definitely provide some tips on how to grow and care for nasturtiums in hanging pots, as well as suggestions on how to make them look beautiful.

To with, it's important to choose the right type of potting soil for your nasturtiums. Look for a well-draining mix that contains perlite or vermiculite, which will help prevent water from pooling in the pot and causing root rot. You can also add some slow-release fertilizer to the soil to give your plants a steady supply of nutrients.

When planting your nasturtiums, be sure to give them enough space to grow. Depending on the variety, they may need anywhere from 6 to 12 inches between plants. You can plant seeds directly in the pot or transplant seedlings, depending on your preference. Just be sure to water the soil well after planting to help settle the roots in.

Once your nasturtiums are established, you can help them thrive by providing regular water and sunlight. These plants prefer full sun or partial shade, so look for a spot where they'll get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. Water them deeply once or twice a week, depending on the weather and the size of your pot.

As for aesthetics, there are many ways to make your nasturtiums look beautiful in a hanging pot. You can choose a brightly colored pot to complement their vibrant blooms, or opt for a more neutral color to let the flowers take center stage. You can also add trailing plants like ivy or sweet potato vine to create a cascading effect, or mix different colors of nasturtiums together for a bold and eye-catching display.

Overall, growing nasturtiums in hanging pots is a great way to bring a bit of natural beauty to your home or garden. With a little bit of care and attention, these lovely plants will thrive and provide you with plenty of colorful blooms to enjoy.


Image nasturtium in hanging pots



Artificial Nasturtium Hanging Basket  House of Silk Flowers  Hanging

Artificial Nasturtium Hanging Basket House of Silk Flowers Hanging


Nearly Natural Nasturtium Hanging Basket Silk Plant 6025  Silk plants

Nearly Natural Nasturtium Hanging Basket Silk Plant 6025 Silk plants


Climbing nasturtium  Trees to plant Nasturtium Bonsai flower

Climbing nasturtium Trees to plant Nasturtium Bonsai flower


Nasturtiums trap aphids repel beetles white flies and squash bugs

Nasturtiums trap aphids repel beetles white flies and squash bugs


Nasturtium Seeds  Moonlight  Flower Seeds in Packets  Bulk  Eden

Nasturtium Seeds Moonlight Flower Seeds in Packets Bulk Eden


5 Reasons To Grow Nasturtiums  10 Delicious Nasturtium Recipes

5 Reasons To Grow Nasturtiums 10 Delicious Nasturtium Recipes


Nearly Natural Nasturtium Hanging Basket Silk Plant  Hanging plants

Nearly Natural Nasturtium Hanging Basket Silk Plant Hanging plants


for the privacy fence  Garten Gartengestaltung Garten bepflanzen

for the privacy fence Garten Gartengestaltung Garten bepflanzen


Edible Flowers Organic Nasturtium Tropaeolum Majus  25 Seeds  Edible

Edible Flowers Organic Nasturtium Tropaeolum Majus 25 Seeds Edible


Nasturtium basket  Plants for hanging baskets Hanging plants

Nasturtium basket Plants for hanging baskets Hanging plants


Post a Comment for "Nasturtium in Hanging Pots: A Beautiful Addition to Your Garden"